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Search Results 200 to 249 of about 1,483 (some duplicates have been removed)
mother-in-law's from england and there's not a lot of support for her. we started talking about what happens when you get home because here she's been in emergency mode. this is one of the things we talk about, this emergency mode. she's been in emergency mode. there's the premature baby and now there's the hurricane and the adrenaline's flowing and suddenly these going to go home soon and i said sometimes what can happen is you can have some anxiety, even depression, you should expect it. i could hear her voice starting to get shaky on the phone. she said i'm starting to feel that. and so then i very gently sort of suggested you need to talk to your doctor, there are things you can do. there are steps you can take. so we ended up talking about how the follow up was so important because i think in those situations charlie she's so focused on the baby. and on the emergency. and she wasn't really paying attention to her own emotions. of course postpartum anxiety and postpartum depression can be serious. >> rose: what kind of pieces have you been doing since. i saw that parts -- parti
. >> it'd be pretty difficult for him to actually repeal the healthcare law within 24 hours. he would need to go to congress and we'd still have to wait and see if republicans are in control of the senate or the house. >> sarah kliff covers healthcare issues for the washington post. while she says democratic control of the senate would throw a wrench into romney's plans, there are immediate steps a romney administration could take to start to undo obama's signature piece of legislation. >> one option the romney administration could pursue is not offering funds to the various departments that are supposed to implement the health care law. that could really slow down and make it very difficult to implement the law even if it were left standing as a law. >> for all the rancor surrounding the legislation, the percentage of americans with medical insurance has barely budged since the law was passed 31 months ago. according to the census an estimated 84.3 percent of americans had medical insurance last year compared to 83.7 percent the year before. because of the legislation, a few million young
>> why are critics charging that the healthcare law is music i want some more. what's he doing? but he can't. look at him! it's just not done. please sir, i want some more. more? more? more? please sir. he has asked f... thank you. what? well he disay please... sir. yes he did. and thank you. yea. and thank you. he's a wonderful boy. (laughing) a do-lightful boy. please and thank you. pass it on. (crowd of children) thank you. crilticings slamming the health care law. they are labeling itaxpayer nded bribe. you agree with t criticings. >> this is cronyism, cheryl. the president goes around with a bag of goodis and hand out. cheap loans for students and solyndra for the greens and of urse, this extra payment for medicare patients? and paying some doctors more to treat patients mor for two years and a total arbitrary confing plan instead of addressing the entitlement. is getting votes in the process. >> it is only a temporary measure and only lasting two years. >> johnathon tagged approximate right. confusing is the worse. they are saying details are yet to be worked out. the administrat
know when it comes to the repair, you know congress has passed and i have supported, laws, including our fema legislation that to the best of our ability to tries to make whole. there is going to be needs for more loans for people to get their businesses back up and running. the most disturbing thing is the inability of people to make a living short-term, because their business has been destroyed. if they were 100 reds of yards of -- hundreds of yards of the boardwalk, this is a beautiful area in and around the area appreciates, and see it destroyed, so completely, you know brings tearing ts tears to, even when people talk like i did about important of pla balance budget, there is always that caveat, we write into balance budget amendment, when there is is a national disaster, that takes precedent, we need to be fully onboard, in providing whatever resources are needed to make it whole. gerri: fema, hamstrung has a lot of debt, congressman, i hope you come back to and talk to us about it. i certainly hope that your family, and everyone close to you is safe tonight, thank you for your
beloved cousin and in law. prayers as you move through this season of sorrow. and of grief. thank you for sharing george breathes with you. profoundly george stanley mcgovern as a son an example of our heritage, i each of you for coming celebrate and honor senator mcgovern's life and witness. to share the mcgovern family's brief. to political colleague, a trusted mentor -- [no audio] and prairie form them to embrace common person and to tirelessly worked for the common good. george mcgovern was also a prairie prophet. he called and inspired an generation to do justice, to love mercy and to walk with our god. he focused the world's on the plight of the hungry. fought for peace. he called on us to repent a misguided, wasteful, and selfish to seeking and speaking the truth. articulate it in his hometown to and not in nazareth to preach the good news to the poor, to be prisoners, to give sight to the blind and to proclaim the year of the lord's savior. we can learn much from jesus' experience in bringing good to the poor and liberating the oppressed. of teaching and preaching in galilee.
exploded. the court decision wiped away the gray area in our campaign finance law. so now there are no limits to what outside groups can do. and so what we're seeing now is an explosion in that area. although it's a problem that existed before citizens united. >> i want to pick up on what leslie was saying earlier. the 501(c)(3)s -- these are all named obviously for the codes, for the tax codes. the 501(c)(3)s where we actually see an enormous number of progressive action going on in these non-profits, they are barred. they can't write these checks. so to me that's where it feels like there is part of this critical asymmetry occurring. is that right, the difference between the threes and fours. >> there are ones that aren't ideological at all. sometimes the group that benefits a local library is a 501(c)(3). it's charitable organization. a c-4 can spend in elections. because there are so many wealthy donors and corporations on the right, this election cycle to defeat president obama, they are pouring money into these groups that don't have disclose -- >> that $74 million s
training from here in the united states. i lead a rule law forum back to the states last january. all aimed at assisting the judicial system. as the saudi system has moved out on a number of areas, we have supported their efforts. in yemen, saudi arabia played a significant role in brokering a gcc led political transition agreement. and continue to provide a leadership role in the friends of yemen and support of the government. there have been the last few years a trend toward multilateralism. i say that with some reservation because certainly the gcc and the arab league have been active in the last two years in ways not previously seen. most recently, saudi arabia has pushed the idea of a gcc union patterned after the eu. for secretary clinton's national security operation form. last month in new york, it provides a venue for collaborative securities discussions with all of the gcc nations. but something has changed. it was reflected in the recent summit last august. i spoke with many of and some of them spoke with a different idea in the atmosphere of the meetings. one individual in parti
a suspect for torching the law offices of vallejo's mayor. the mayor at the time called it a act of intimidation. the suspect is charged with setting fires in a vallejo funeral home. and at a church. this is evening held in the jail on three counts of arson. >> two teenagers have been arrested for the murder of a woman found dead in a house fire last week. here is a picture of one suspect. the 18-year-old made his first court appearance this afternoon. investigators believe he and a 16-year-old whose picture we do not have brutally beat the victim and then set her body on fire to cover up a burglary. he is 16 years old but has been charged as an adult in this case. he's a relative of the victim. police arrested him in tennessee. >> san francisco police are warning muni riders to be careful when using their smart phones. there have been thousands. thousands of thefts reported this year. if you're not paying attention, authorities say you're wearing a target on your back. we're live with the story. that is an incredible number of thefts. >> that is right. about 2000. but that is wh
the list, there are many. there is the san francisco charter, there is the budget laws and policies, the debt laws and policies, the environmental justice policy, the community benefits policy, the fund balarie serve policy, the rates policy and the land use framework. and i go through that long list because it does provide assurances and many of which are very targeted and deliberate because of your oversight and your desire to have them. so, i think that was helpful. and i think the citizens advisory committees, the revenue bond oversight committee and the rate fairness board appreciate that and knowing that and going through that list as well. in addition to the goal that i know you and former president moran had, the assurance of transparency, we also reviewed what transparency and oversight we have now. and that includes your oversight as well as the mayor's office, the board of supervisors, the rate fairness board, of course the citizens advisory committee and all their subcommittees, which are very helpful and informative and the policy process and the information process. th
have strong connections with the city. my wife went to college here. my brother went to law school here is still practices here million diss sun does live in the city with his family. my wife has aunts and cousins so i have a strong connection to atlanta. tonight i will discuss abraham lincoln's role in the crisis of the union 18631861. more specifically what abraham lincoln and rejected any meaningful compromise following his election the country was gripped by a crisis because they feared lincoln it was the number party and probably sell. it did not have a significant connection lincoln was elected without a single electoral votes without the slave states and own the for border states and they are merely a handful. for the first time in nation's history to be taking over the executive branch of the national government. in the south major institution is the republicans' determination into a unit to win a national election without southern support republicans condemned the south as undemocratic. even un-american. with this party on the threshold for those who practice the gospel and new
law- enforcement agencies. >> for a search and rescue, squad, fire arms, rural areas. not easily accessible by a patrol car those types of situations. it could be a tremendous search help. >> the advantage is attractive. about a low amount of fuel on a helicopter. $1500 per helicopter. the shares to park and has avoided the unmanned aircraft and privacy concerns that arise. >> when they think of a drawn in think of military drones that fly over pakistan. or a-grown but this is a quad helicopter. the about privacy concerns are always a concern for us. we have that robots and that the bomb squad and in the worst bomb squads for remote control. we do not roll closed down the road this is mission however specific. if we have a person that is fired off a gun and we can deploy this and nothing that the public would have a problem with that. of this is an increased interest with the use of small aircraft could expand. >> is already out there is not going to go away. this was just a test but they would like to see these deployed sooner than later. in dublin, kron 4. >> here is a look at
many states that were trying to do a voter suppression with the idea laws, now we have won the most of that. now we have to be careful that the accurate count is given. everybody in the campaign has to be ready for recounting. if it goes to the supreme court, but we have to go there. host: are you still there? caller: it must be fair. host: from our twitter page -- steve is joining us from virginia on the republican line. caller: there is no such thing as a voter suppression, that is just silly. there is a voter fraud as was revealed by james keene where he recorded the son of jim moran telling somebody how to commit of voter fraud. there are lots of dead people that are registered. that was the purpose of this to get the dead people off of the voter rolls. the process is going forward in virginia. everybody who registers in virginia gets a voter i.d.. it is a responsibility. a lot of people did not want to have anything to do with responsibility. host: thank you for the call. eight romney ryan white house, it could happen. -- a romney-biden white house, it could happen. the magic n
as a community service, i host a radio and tv program called "folk law for ordinary folk," it's a very tough one in the sense that workers at some point are essentially giving up higher salary and higher pay in exchange for those pension benefits. so to come back later on and essentially cut that out from under them, the question is one of fairness and of equity. that being said, as far as police and firefighters, obviously those are public safety areas and it's a little bit different in the sense that we definitely need to protect those pensions in a different manner than we do others. as far as other ways to save, i would certainly look at capping pensions moving forward, so that they don't increase incrementally over time. i think we need to put a cap on that now before it starts to burgeon and get out of control. >> thank you. >> miss olague. >> i believe i was one of the individuals who answered no. i don't think we should balance the budget on the back of the workforce, and there was prop c. prop b was the adachi measure and proper c was a lot of pension reform where the unions and the
or someone else for 72 hours. we need to enact laura's law and mr. dufty is working on that and finding housing for these individuals but not to keep going back to the economy but one solution is improve the economy so we can improve these people's lives. thank you. >> thank you. >> l the homeless problem it's very, very interesting because you know some cities don't -- i think one of the reasons we do have a problem is because of the wonderful social services that we have here in this city and unfortunately as someone who has sat on several committees it's disheartening that just across the east bay, even if you go to oakland, it changes drastically and i think it's one of the reasons people come to san francisco. do they all live here? absolutely not. and i think we have to get tough with this issue and the housing authority truly needs some restructuring, so that they can do their mandate which is to house people because that's another issue, but there is money missing there, so i think we have to be tough with that and it's like tough love but because we do care and it's going ha
these things, um, in their practices if not in the laws they technically, they put on paper. no senior government official has ever been prosecuted for leaking. there's been hardly -- there's been almost zero disciplinary action. there hasn't been much energy or resources invested in finding leakers, much less going after them. in light of that longstanding background, it's not crazy to think that the government has in some practical sense, um, actually has kind of blessed "the new york times" to play a certain role within bounds. >> yeah. i mean, i guess the hard part i have is i agree with you at the sociological level, but there's no sociological defense for drake. those guys can't -- >> [inaudible] >> right. they can't come in and say, well, the big shots are doing it, and can it's good for society, but, you know, that's not a defense. >> this is why you're legally vulnerable. but i will say the jury plays some role here at least in espionage act prosecutions in channeling -- i gave the case for why at least in technical terms it's very hard to see why every classified information
-span2. now more from the fordham law school conference. next, we hear from former cia acting general counsel john rizzo, and former justice department inspector general lyn fine. posted by the center on national security, this is an hour 20 minutes. >> okay, marty has charged us with finding all the solutions, and luckily i'm only the moderator so i would have to charge the three of you with giving us some solutions. i think the way this panel is organized is to provide context for what you just heard. i hadn't quite realized it would work as a will that we have the right people to give the right context, both in terms of the law, in terms of the post-9/11 decade and where it's taken us, in terms of the self-regulating institutional function of government, to figure out its own problems, make its own recommendations and maybe suggest its own solutions. and in terms of what all this means from the point of view of working in the field, on the ground, inside a covert realm. so we're going to try to tie this all together today by looking at some of these issues. and i have to trust that
to all those whose hearts be true. here by the city of law by the bay, [speaker not understood] the animals, almighty say. free them all the mother of boycotts president bradford bell the call. -- be the call. i tell you, i love you all and [speaker not understood] is going to toss you off the golden gate bridge, i wouldn't allow it not unless you have life jackets. regarding the giantsv, the story of the day is pitcher who was speaking on behalf of human trafficking in palo alto in two days. and let me touch upon sheriff mirkarimi, he's been given a reprieve so i would encourage you to see [speaker not understood] any negatives and allow him and help him so that he may now be involved in with the second opportunity to clear the case of kevin cohen. for myself and ted gunderson, we were the guardian, we gave them the information can they refuse to print it. we have dan noyes an investigative reporter for kgo that refuses to investigate. he's disregarded all the information he's been given over the last year and a half and he wants to do something with some secondhand informatio
. and law enforcement agencies are sending a clear message. troublemakers are not welcome. crews are working extra innings tonight, working to set up a festive giants world series victory celebration. >> we have a giants dog. >> reporter: gearing up for hungry crowds along the parade routes. workers are expecting a family-friendly event, even though sunday night was not so friendly. revelers burned a muni bus down the street. >> there was no damage done to our store front. so, we're grateful for that, considering everything that happened in the area. >> reporter: more supporters are launching an online effort to help him get back to work. there's also an online effort to help police find vandals. san francisco's city attorney says if he can build a case, this man may have a repair bill to play. >> i can identify that individual and make that tie-in, i'm going to prove my case. >> reporter: police arrested 35 people after the giants' victory sunday. the district attorney charged 9 of the 11 cases he has so far. the district attorney says criminal charges won't be the only consequence. >> you
communities all across the country are hopping on the "ban" wagon. the day after rye, new york, passed its law against plastic bags, teens were handing out green alternatives. >> there are no more plastic bags going to be offered in stores, so we're helping people out by giving them reusable bags. >> reusable bags are considered the best alternative... >> wonderful. >> ...because even paper bags are bad for the environment. although they can be recycled, they still use up natural resources to make, and the manufacturing process causes pollution. >> it's completely useless to use something once and then throw it away. >> people who work to ban plastic bags say the new laws help reduce the use of paper products, too. >> what most of these communities have seen when they pass these types of laws, is that they've seen an increase in reusable-bag rates, which means that their purchases of paper bags have gone down. >> by their using a bag that they can use in other stores and at other times, it reduces my costs for paper bags. >> long ago, stores didn't give out bags at all. you had to bring your o
today. it also puts our community at ease. especially our law enforcement community. >> more than 30 law enforcement officers and 50 agent from the bureau of alcohol, tobacco and fire arms were involved in tracking stewart down and capturing him. he'll be extradited back to virginia to face numerous charges. >> the public responded and our law enforcement partners rose to the challenge and took this predator off the street. >> investigators say stewart maintained a website and apparently used it to taunt police who were looking for him. >>> an update now to several violent attacks in the district. police have arrested two more men in connection with the eastern market beating that left a man severely beaten. police believe the group is linked to at least nine separate attacks. >>> four days until election day and president obama is making up for the lull in campaigning because of the superstorm. the president was back on the campaign trail yesterday making appearances in wisconsin, nevada and boulder, colorado. tomorrow the president will be in manassas and will get a boost from former p
wall street." he is now a senior fellow and adjunct professor at the new york university school of law. neil barofsky, welcome. >> thank you. >> when you were a kid, did you say, "mom, dad, i want to grow up and be an inspector general?" >> no, i said i wanted to be a lawyer, though. >> you did? >> it must be some sort of major genetic flaw i have. but my mom keeps a fortune cookie that said, "you will be a great lawyer one day." and i signed it and dated it. i thini was 12 years old.12 so there was something weird about me that i wanted to be a lawyer. i wanted to be a prosecutor. i mean, that was sort of what i wanted to do. maybe it's from watching tv shows, "perry mason," as a kid or something like that. but i was always drawn to the law. and so i think i did have this drive for public service. but certainly never did think that i'd be an inspector general one day. i didn't rlly even know what ll that was until i actually got at the job, to be honest with you. >> when you took the job, i read about you. and i thought, "why is someone like that, with that record of prosecution going
, law and order, welfare reform, were actually able to be implemented walking on egg shells, terrified they are going to say some word that's going to be deemed, you know, an incipient klan sentiment and that's why the crux of my book is the turning point of the o.j. verdict when i think white america saw black people cheering the acquittal of an obviously guilty black celebrity and said that's it, the white guilt bank is shut down. not only did that help race relations, it specifically helped black people as republican policies that had been pushed for years but demagogued as racist, law and order, welfare reform, were actually able to be implemented helping black people most of all. i mean, helping everyone but helping -- giuliani's policies in new york saved tens of thousands of black lives and i don't know if he would have been able to continue with his very tough on crime policies which were in fact demagogued as racist while he was implementing them, if you didn't have this change in feeling in america where people were just sick of hearing of being accused of racism. >> let's ta
with the city. my wife went to college here. one of my brothers went to law school here, and he still lives in a city and practices law here. older son also went to law school. but he does not live in a city. my youngest son does, however, with his family. he lives here. moreover, my wife has an aunt and cousins who live in the city. so i still have very strong connections to land. now, tonight i'm going to discuss abraham lincoln stroll, 1860-1861. more specifically, i want to talk about why abraham lincoln rejected any meaningful compromise. following his election as president november 1860, the country the script but a crisis. because many southerners feared lincoln and his republican party. republican party was a northern party, and proudly so. but it did not have a significant southern connection. lincoln was elected without a single electoral votes from any of the 15 slave states, and only four border states, missouri, kentucky, maryland and delaware did he get any popular vote. and they are nearly a handful. for the first time in the nation's history, a party without any notable sout
to us and the evidence is there, we will prosecute it to the fullest extent of the law. >> several of those charges include assaulting a police officer, discharging a firearm, robbery, resisting arrest and arson. >>> san francisco's mayor wants to prevent a repeat of sunday's violence tomorrow. in his news conference today mayor lee emphasized team work among all the fans coming out for the victory parade and asked people to look out for one another. >> this is a family-friendly event. it will be celebrated by every neighborhood in the city. we all want everybody to come down but because of the sheer numbers, we ask that everybody look out for each other as a team would. >> this is also the chinese year of the dragon, so mayor lee presented giants ceo larry baer with a paper dragon holding the world series baseball to symbolize the bold team work that the giants showed in winning the championship. ♪ [ music ] >> and today was a final tune- up for the archbishop riordan high school band for the second time in three years, the band is making an appearance at a giants victory parade
coyle of the national law journal. >> woodruff: and spencer michels looks at the complaints about apple's maps and the high stakes for those trying to come up with something better. >> the battle over digital map making indicates how crucial this field has become and it could bode well for consumers as the maps get better. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the u.s. death toll from the giant storm named sandy has risen to at least 63 today. about 6.5 million homes and businesses are still without electricity though there were signs of daily life returning to its usual rhythm in some places. a familiar sound returned to lower manhattan streets last night. ( horns honking ) the power did not. police helpe
you get after the health care law. medicare open enrollment. now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. ♪ >> new report raising doubts whether the afghan government will be ready for withdraw of troops in 2014. the afghan government will likely be incapable of sustaining national facilities after the transition in 2014. and the expected decrease in u.s. and coalition support. molly henneberg has read the report and is live from our d.c. newsroom with more on this not surprising development. molly? are you there? >> shep, one glaring problem according to the report is that many afghan soldiers and contractors are illiterate and can't read manuals and blueprints for fittings. the inspector general writes looming problems include quote lack of sufficient numbers and quality of personnel as well as undeveloped budgeting, procurement beings and lo guess particular -- logistic funding. afghan national security forces facilities, particularly police facilities are at risk of being wasted. we're talking about at least 11.7 billion u.s. taxpayer dollars there to bui
Search Results 200 to 249 of about 1,483 (some duplicates have been removed)